An early incarnation of Canyon Pete and Billy*? (or something else entirely, something too horrifying to imagine, something, perhaps, diabolical in nature?)

by illimitableoceanofinexplicability

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That’s what some are saying

Who can know for sure

There’s no telling

They’re not talking

Oh, no!

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Panic, sheer panic. We all enjoy it. Flying off the handle, just going plain nuts, losing your shit, good times.

But, please

try to control yourselves just this once

We’ll figure this out

It’s probably not Canyon Pete and Billy

How could it be?

Though

Frighteningly

one of them

is pointing to something

in a book

what book?

I wonder

Did a chill

just run up

your spine?

Yeah,

mine, too.

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.* For those unaware

Canyon Pete and Billy are characters who originally appeared in the cartoon ‘Canyon Pete and Billy’ created by Jack Abernathy in 1963 and which ran daily (and on Sundays in colour) in The Sydney Morning Herald from 1963 until early 1971 when  a group of children from the suburb of Woolloomooloo, after they, as many of the children involved claimed at the time, read an installment of ‘Canyon Pete and Billy’ then went about on bicycles, riding across lawns, and in some cases through gardens, using inappropriate language and generally terrorizing the neighborhood for nearly three quarters of an hour, their behavior being described by an eye witness at the time as ” acting like they had all cracked a fruity”. Though the riot was eventually quelled by a unit from the Special Air Service Regiment a nationwide petition was started by the group, Australians Against the Use of Inappropriate Language which, through a nation wide campaign, garnered millions of signatures and lead to the banning of ‘Canyon Pete and Billy’ from further publication.

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The cartoon which caused the children to behave badly
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Years after the furor, Jack Abernathy, living in Torrance, California, and employed as a manager at a local Toys R Us, was befriended by a tech savvy young millenial who, having seen old copies of the ‘Canyon Pete and Billy’ cartoon piled amongst the other rubbish in Abernathy’s squalid apartment, convinced the old man to make more of the cartoons for publishing on the internet. Unfortunately, a week later, distressed by the pressure of producing funny gags and under the influence of alcohol, Abernathy fled into the Mojave desert where it is presumed he died. The young tech savvy millenial, upon receiving a large grant from The Institute for the Study of Slightly Varying Circumstances employed the artist Archie Jenkins, called “the creative mastermind” by Artnews magazine, and went ahead with publishing new ‘Canyon Pete and Billy’ cartoons.

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