The Proper Technique for Viewing a Two Sided Drawing with an up close look at a still digital image of both sides of the two sided drawing from the short film mentioned before

by illimitableoceanofinexplicability

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That’s a somewhat ungainly title, though it does tell what needs to be told.
Anyway
Here is a short, and I mean, very short, film (so short you’ll hardly notice you’ve watched anything at all), which other than being called short could (depending on the person and the various circumstances they have either endured or find themselves in at the moment) possibly also be described as interesting, exciting, strange, good fun, boring, the worst, dumb, foolishness, evil, satanic, ungodly, etc..,etc….

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Alright, you watched it, and now you can put on your CV that you have received training in the proper technique for viewing a two sided drawing!

Now, before we look at the digital image of the two sided drawing you saw in the film I would like to blow my own horn a little, if you don’t mind.

-Begin horn blowing-

While I am not the originator of drawing on both sides of a sheet of paper, I am one of the few, if not the only practitioner of this technique who has, due to his love of viewers like you, proposed a film be made (and subsequently have it made by the much praised auteur, Mr. Jack Olson) demonstrating how one should properly view a two-sided drawing.

-End horn blowing-

OK

Let’s have a look!

Two drawings done on opposite sides of the same sheet of paper!

twoside

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Before you go, please, allow me to give credit to my Mother, for it was she who encouraged me (with words perhaps more harsh than were necessary, but said out of love nonetheless) to draw on both sides of the paper, Thank you, Mother, this post is for you.

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.Also:

You may have made note in the film of the fingernails, and if so, I wish to assure you that their appearance is only to add realism to the part of Howard Hughes the demonstrator was playing at the time in his local theater group’s production of a play I wrote called ‘Howard, can you hear me?’, about a little boy who is befriended by the ghost of Howard Hughes after his Father is killed on September 11th.

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