It is with mixed emotions

by illimitableoceanofinexplicability

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Whenever somebody resigns, or does something out of the ordinary, the president at our institution always sends out an email that begins

It is with extremely mixed emotions that I announce the resignation of so-and-so. He’s leaving to go do another job Z at institute W.

I am kind of confused by this kind of statement from a higher up. What does it mean?I imagine one of the following:

  • “I didn’t really like him, so it’s kinda good he left. Anyway best of luck to him.”
  • “Always hated him”.

Why do people phrase resignation announcements like this, and what are the goals with the ambiguity (in writing “mixed emotions”, but without elaborating)?

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Ha, ha. I didn’t write the above words, I took them, plain ol’ stole them actually, from what describes itself as “a site for speakers of other languages learning English” Well, good luck with that. Doesn’t make a lick of sense from what I can tell, and I’ve been yabbering away in it for more years than I’d care to recollect. I originally included it as a sort of excuse for using the phrase ‘it is with mixed emotions’, but then, I saw the words ‘the president at our institution’ (which I’ve highlighted in red), and just about busted a gut laughing. However, now, I’m remembering the real purpose of the post, and so, become a little more serious, a tad bit solemn even, while presenting the following with genuine mixed emotions.

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