A Curious set of Circumstances

The undiscovered country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will,
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all,
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment,
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action

William Shakespeare (1564–1616).  The Tragedy of Hamlet Prince of Denmark

 

 

 

 

  I believe it was that old Spaniard Picasso who said “I do not seek, I find”. I have no idea what he was referring to with that statement, perhaps his art, but it doesn’t matter because I’m going to use the quote for my own purposes. However, in the context of my investigations into the slightly varying circumstances the statement would be better as “Sometimes without looking I stumble across things”. The Picasso quote is much more dramatic, he seems determined and assured where my quote gives one the feeling that I have no idea what I am doing and that if I am in any way successful at whatever it is I am doing it is purely by accident. This may be the case. What does it matter? It doesn’t, for I have stumbled, once again, across evidence pertaining to the circumstances that vary slightly and as that is, for the most part, my life’s work at this moment and ultimately how it was discovered is unimportant. Although, I do understand that there are those who wish to see behind the curtain, to know the process as if they could somehow duplicate it and achieve similar results, results that I have achieved only through the accidental allowance of the accidental, through the following of a philosophy best described as ‘If I stand in one place long enough something is bound to hit me’. So, yes, please, attempt to duplicate, to recreate that which was not created, that which was born of itself, that which stands, to paraphrase Darwin’s Bulldog, on an isthmus in an illimitable ocean of inexplicability.

 

Discovering what I forgot

 

“Man’s “progress” is but a gradual discovery that his questions have no meaning”

Antoine de Saint-Exupery

 

Like ancient secrets, the circumstances that vary slightly were, for whatever reasons forgotten by me. This, I have thought, could be because that which completely obsesses me now was at one time only a passing fancy, a whim that had no meaning other than a passing of the time, an amusement short lived that, while ‘fun’, is a poor reason for going to the lengths I have now been going to. It could be as if I was desperately trying to come up with meaning behind my reasons for having toast instead of cereal one morning, and while I have no doubt this could be done, it does seem to be what some would call ‘a colossal waste of time’. Some are usually wrong though, you know this, well, some do, maybe not you personally, but you are at least aware of the phenomenon of some knowing something even if you do not. And, as far as reasons, for toast instead of cereal, or anything else for that matter, once it is done it is done, though I myself have been known to ‘cry over spilt milk’ as they say. So, if you would like, please shed a few tears right now for the milk on the floor which I am attempting to soak up with a dish towel and then rinse and ring out over the sink. Should I, should we give any more thought to that now diluted milk streaming away through so many pipes on its journey to the treatment plant or into some river somewhere? I cannot answer that for you, but I can tell you my answer, it is “Yes, yes we should”.

 

 

As a working hypothesis to explain the riddle of our existence, I propose that our universe is the most interesting of all possible universes, and our fate as human beings is to make it so.

— Freeman Dyson

 

 

There is the material world, and some believe, the spiritual world, then there is, as I am sure you are aware in some way if you are reading this, the digital world. These recently discovered drawings exist only in the digital world, there physical existence ended at some time in the past, yet their digital selves can still, if we are receptive to them, reach out into this world and perhaps provide us with answers or at least more riddles for us to ponder in our spare time. So, let us now move down the page on our electronic Ouija boards and have a look at these residents of the digital ether and remember in our nervous anticipation that the answers they provide depend upon the questions we ask.

 

5

 At one time there were at least 4 Slightly varying Circumstances drawings each varying slightly from one another

 

 

4

 While varying more than slightly from the original Slightly Varying Circumstances drawing this drawing does contain the ‘house’ and the arrow.

 

 

3

 Again the ‘house’ makes an appearance, this time seemingly isolated from something by what could be a moat, definitely a deep ditch which surrounds it on all sides leading me to believe it was constructed to keep someone or something away. Or, maybe, to keep the inhabitant of the ‘house’ from escaping!

 

 

2

 Here is the ‘house’ and arrow repeated as well as the second occurance of the ‘X’. The meaning of the ‘X’ while seeming to be a ‘place marker’ as in pirate treasure or shopping mall maps is still to be determined exactly.

 

 

1

 Once more the arrow and the ‘house’ that appear in the original Slightly Varying Circumstances drawing. In this drawing the placement of these symbol/objects most closely resembles the original. The quote is believed to refer to the inhabitant of the ‘house’ although this is merely a guess and should not be believed so wholeheartedly that you lose touch with reason.

 

 

 

That is it so far. This is where we stand. Where to now, I wonder? I have no idea and could not hope to answer that question here in a fashion that would please me or appease you, so, I will leave you until next time with the words of that other British bulldog, Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill.  

 

“This is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.”